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Students

Design and Technology (D&T)

Design and Technology is an important subject area for students of all ages, as it helps to prepare them for living and working in a technological society.  

It enables young people to solve problems and work in teams; it encourages independent, analytical thought; and it develops creative skills and ‘visual literacy’.  Design and Technology acts as a perfect springboard into cross curricular activities, offering opportunities to explore subjects from Art and History to Mathematics and Science.

D&T

We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.”    

 Albert Einstein

Key Stage 3 - Years 7 & 8

Design & Technology is a core part of the school curriculum.  Students learn via a carousel of projects designed to cover a broad and balanced D&T curriculum based on three one hour lessons per fortnight throughout this Key Stage.

Students are taught in mixed ability groups to help inspire creative ideas that are born out of innovation, trying to break down the barriers of ability set by literacy and numeracy.  Design & Technology covers a broad range of materials and design tasks, encouraging students to use whatever they need to solve the design brief in innovative ways.

Within our curriculum we strive for students to develop ideas by drawing inspiration from various sources of information.  To clarify their ideas through discussion, drawing and modelling, we encourage them to consider aesthetic and economic dimensions.  Our briefs are designed to foster an awareness of culture, society and the environment as students gain knowledge and understanding of materials, ingredients and techniques.  Youngsters consider the designs of others as they develop their work.  They experience working with a range of tools, materials, ingredients, equipment and processes with precision.  We have built in opportunities to refine interpersonal skills through constructive teamwork.


Year 7

In Year 7, students undertake three projects which teach them a broad range of designing and making skills.  The basis is to have a good grounding in Health and Safety in dangerous environments and to have a broad range of tools at their disposal to be able to become effective designer makers.

STEADY HAND GAME - This project speaks for itself.  Students will be learning about Health and Safety in the workshop, working with multi materials such as metals and plastics, and also basic electronics and CNC machining.  Students will also be going through the design process, including modelling and testing.

FOOD - During this project students will focus on Five – a - Day. Students will develop practical skills using a variety of tools and equipment, learn the importance of hygiene and safety when working in the food area, learn how to carry out and record sensory testing and develop an understanding of healthy eating and current dietary advice.

MIX IT UP - The main aim of this project is for students to learn how to use CAD / CAM and lasercutter technologies to create a Drawing Buddy.  They also focus on designing skills, formal drawing techniques and a range of modelling processes that can be used to communicate ideas.  Students also work on developing their skills in mechanisms and mechanical systems using our interactive Focus E-Learning software.


"The world always seems brighter when you’ve just made something that wasn’t there before.” — Neil Gaiman


 

To download the student workbook then please click on the project below:

 

Year 7 Mix Project COVID

Year 7 Food COVID

Year 7 Recipe Book


 


Year 8

In Year 8, Students undertake three projects that continue to build on experiences from year 7. There is a strong emphasis on learning key skills including designing, systems and control and P.I.C.Programming.

Year 8 learn to develop vital skills including effective systems to enable them to problem solve.  They focus on mechanisms, logic, programming using peripheral interface controllers and complete a series of baking challenges to further their creative skills.  The key ingredient to Year 8 is finding innovative solutions to problems…


"A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” — Antoine de Saint Exupéry


 

To download the student workbook then please click on the project below:

Year 8 Make Time COVID

Year 8 The Heat Is On COVID

Year 8 Food COVID

Year 8 Recipe Book

 

Key Stage 4 - Years 9-11

The Design and Technology department offers a wide range of optional subjects that students can follow.  These range from GCSE’s in Design & Technology (with specialist extension routes in Resistant Materials or Paper and Boards), and Food Preparation & Nutrition to Level 1 Vocational courses in Horticulture and also in Motor Vehicle Studies.


GCSE Design and Technology

Awarding body, specification number and title:

AQA, 8552, GCSE (9-1) Design and Technology

The aim of this course is to encourage students to use a range of materials when designing and making three-dimensional products.  The Design & Technology course calls for students to become independent and creative problem solvers. They must look for needs, wants and opportunities, responding to them by developing a range of design ideas and making products. This course combines practical skills with an understanding of aesthetics, social and environmental issues, function, and industrial practices. Students reflect on and evaluate relevant present and past design and technology, its uses and effects.  The course seeks to help students to become discriminating and informed users of technology and innovative designers of products.  It also encourages them to think and intervene creatively to improve the quality of life for society.

Lessons within Design & Technology are a combination of focused practical tasks that are aimed at developing specific skills and knowledge, and a range of projects that have been carefully designed to be enjoyable and realistic to industrial situations.  All students complete a Design and Make project of their choice, in response to a range of contexts set by the examination board, which counts for 50% of their GCSE marks.

Year 9

The course in Year 9 will be focused on learning the Core Technical Principles for the GCSE in Design and Technology.  These core principles include the following:

  • new and emerging technologies
  • energy generation and storage
  • developments in new materials
  • systems approach to designing
  • mechanical devices
  • materials and their working properties.

The year will include a range of projects that cover the core skills needed for the first section of the final Year 11 examination.

Year 10

The course in Year 10 will focus mainly on the specialist extension skills required for the second half of the examination.  These are focused around Timber, metal-based materials and polymers or Paper and Boards.  The year will include working on projects that increase skills and knowledge in this area.  Students will also work on developing their confidence in the mathematics required to confidently respond to design situations and technical questions.

All students develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the following specialist technical principles: • selection of materials or components • forces and stresses • ecological and social footprint • sources and origins • using and working with materials • stock forms, types and sizes • scales of production • specialist techniques and processes • surface treatments and finishes.

In the Spring Term students will start preparing for the Non-Examined Assessment project that will start on the 1st June.  This project accounts for 50% of their final mark.

Year 11

This year will focus mainly on the completion of the Non-Examined Assessment project.

This is a Substantial design and make task based on a Context that is set by the examination board.  The project is individual and students are encouraged to create their own design brief in response to one of the contexts.  Students are assessed on: • Identifying and investigating design possibilities • Producing a design brief and specification • Generating design ideas • Developing design ideas • Realising design ideas • Analysing & evaluating

All students will produce a prototype and an A3 portfolio of evidence.

Assessment:

  • One examination of 2 hours. 50 % of total marks
  • NEA Individual Project.           50 % of total marks

Click on the links below for examples of students folders and worksheets

GCSE D&T Outside the Box

GCSE D&T Progress Tracker

GCSE D&T Unit 1 Booklet

GCSE D&T Unit 2 Booklet


GCSE D&T: FOOD PREPARATION AND NUTRITION

Awarding body, specification number and title:

AQA, 8585, GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition

Course content and structure:

Year 9

The first year will focus on giving students opportunities to develop confidence in using basic kitchen equipment and develop the core skills, which form the backbone of the GCSE course.  These will range from basic hygiene and knife skills, to sauce making, tenderising and much more.  These skills will be taught through focussed practical sessions, accompanying food preparation tasks and supplemented with a range of theory workbook activities.

Towards the end of the year, students will begin to develop a more detailed knowledge of macronutrients, healthy eating, balanced meals and how to analyse the nutritional content of the food that they have prepared.  Students will be expected to complete regular practical and theory assessments to inform them of the progress that they are making.

Year 10

During year 10, students will build upon the basic skills developed during the first year of the course to equip students with the practical skills and knowledge they will need to complete the final elements of the course.  Theoretical focus will be on food nutrition and health, food science, food safety, food choice and food provenance.  Students will continue to prepare a wide range of dishes to support their understanding and continue to develop core skills and refine practical technique.  Practical and theoretical assessment will continue to be a regular feature in lessons along with the collection of key portfolio evidence.

Year 11

In Year 11 students have to complete two independent projects that form 50% of their final marks.

Task 1: Food investigation: Students' understanding of the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients. Practical investigations are a compulsory element of this task.

Task 2: Food preparation assessment: Students' knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking, presentation of food and application of nutrition related to the chosen task. Students will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning in advance how this will be achieved.

This GCSE is assessed by:

One examination of 1 hour 45 minutes

50% of total marks

Two Individual Projects.

50% of total marks 

Task 1: Written or electronic report (1,500–2,000 words) including photographic evidence of the practical investigation.

Task 2: Written or electronic portfolio including photographic evidence.

 


D&T LEVEL 1: Practical Horticulture

Awarding body, specification number and title:
ABC, Level 1 Certificate, Practical Horticulture

Course content and structure:

This course is practically based and prepares students to enter employment in the horticultural sector or to progress onto further education vocational qualifications. Students are able to develop a knowledge and understanding of opportunities that exist within the horticultural industry.

 Students taking the ABC level 1 in Horticulture will follow a course comprising of eight units. The units, once passed, will provide an equivalent qualification to a 3-1 grade at GCSE. All the units are practical based and are assessed throughout the course in stages. The units are:

  • Maintaining the safety of self and others in the workplace.
  • Principles of the maintenance of equipment.
  • Principles of identifying the presence of, and controlling common pests and disease.
  • Introduction to garden design.
  • Care of planted area.
  • Plant selection.
  • Understanding organic horticulture.
  • Identify weeds.

 Students will be required to have appropriate outdoor all weather clothing and suitable safety boots to undertake the practical nature of the units.

Assessment:

This ABC qualification is assessed through coursework and practical tasks, supported by written and recorded evidence, which will make up each student’s coursework folder.

 

Click on the links below for student worksheets

Care for a planted area

Cultivate land by single digging or forking

Identifying & controlling common pests & diseases

Identifying Weeds

Introduction to Garden design

Plant selection

Preparing ground for sowing and planting

Principles of the maintenance of equipment

Sow seed outdoors in drills by hand

Understanding organic horticulture


 


D&T LEVEL 1: Certificate in Motor Studies

Awarding body, specification number and title:
ABC, Level 1 Certificate, Motor Vehicle Studies (motorcycle pathway)

Course content and structure:

This course is practically based and prepares students to enter employment in the Motor Vehicle Maintenance sector or to progress onto further education vocational qualifications. Students are able to develop a knowledge and understanding of opportunities that exist within the motor vehicle industry.

 

Students taking the ABC level 1 in Motor Vehicle Studies will follow a course comprising of twelve possible units. The units, once passed, will provide an equivalent qualification to a 3-1 grade at GCSE. All the units are practical based and are assessed throughout the course in stages. The units are:

  • General health & safety; In case of fire, Fire extinguishers, Personal protection, PPE, Safe use of machinery, Electrical safety, Flammable substances, Manual handling, Safety regulations
  • Vehicle engine lubrication; Used engine oils, checking & topping up oil level, types of engine oils, changing engine oil & filter, checking work.
  • Vehicle cooling systems; Reasons for a cooling system, types of cooling systems, air cooling, liquid cooling, topping up cooling systems, antifreeze, draining and refilling cooling systems.
  • Fuel & exhaust systems; The main components of fuel systems, petrol fuel systems, diesel fuel systems, the main components of an exhaust system.
  • Engine operating systems; Main components of an engine, the four-stroke cycle, two-stroke cycle, dismantling & reassembling an engine, checking work.
  • Vehicle spark Ignition systems; The main components, removing and replacing ignition systems components, checking ignition timing.
  • Braking systems; The main components of a braking systems, hydraulic operation,
  • Vehicle electrical systems; Battery, fuses, wiring, switches, relays, motors, alternators, lighting components, removing and replacing electrical system components, soldering a terminal
  • Transmission systems;  Gearbox, clutch, final drive, drive line, single / multi plate clutches, rear wheel drive, torque converter operation.
  • Vehicle steering & suspension systems;  Major components of the steering systems, rack & pinion, power steering, purpose, springs, torsion bar, leaf springs, coil springs, dampers, struts.
  • Vehicle wheel & tyre systems;  Tyre sidewall markings, speed index, remove & refit tyres, valves, tube & tubeless, run flat wheel and tyres, pressure-monitoring systems.
  • Vehicle body & Interior cleaner;  Why valet – road safety, resale value, fuel consumption, preparing to valet, carrying out a valet service, selecting and using cleaning materials.

Assessment:

This ABC qualification is assessed through coursework and practical tasks, supported by written and recorded evidence, which will make up each student’s coursework folder.

 

Click on the links below for student worksheets

Health and Safety for Motor Vehicle Studies

Introduction to engine liquid cooling and engine lubrication systems

Introduction to engineering equipment and materials

Introduction to Motorcycle maintenance

Introduction to steering and suspension

Introduction to vehicle exhaust systems

Introduction to vehicle transmission systems

Introduction to vehicle wheels and tyres

Introduction to spark ignition power units

 

Key Stage 5

For information of courses in Years 12 and 13 click on this link >>

Design and Technology Resources

Skills and qualities for the Future - from studying Design & Technology at Sheringham High School

  • Technical ability - You may need particular technical skills and specialist knowledge of how things work or need to be designed and built.
  • Problem solving - Some jobs particularly require problem solving skills and creative thinking to recognise problems and their causes, to identify a range of possible solutions and then assess and decide the best way forward.
  • Organisation - You’ll need to be able to plan and schedule work. This could include being able to prioritise what needs to be done and by when.
  • Communication - If your job requires verbal communication, you may need to write or give speeches and presentations. For jobs which require written communication skills, you will need to write clearly and convincingly – you could be producing or dealing with legal documents or writing articles for a newspaper. You may also require good listening skills, the ability to negotiate, or to be persuasive.
  • Creativity - You may need specific artistic or design skills for a job, or you may need to draw on a good imagination to come up with creative solutions to business challenges.
  • Business management - Some jobs require a good understanding of how businesses work and the management skills to help the business run smoothly and succeed.
  • Analytics - You’ll be collecting and examining information in detail to arrive at a solution, to answer a key question or make an informed decision.
  • Customer service - Any job which involves contact with customers and the public requires good customer service skills. Whether it’s on the phone or face-to-face it’s important to be able to make customers feel welcome, to be polite and listen.
  • Discipline - You need to know and do what is expected of you. This ranges from organising yourself, being on time, to being responsible. Some jobs need particular discipline skills such as being able to persevere with the task and plans until you accomplish them, or following strict procedures.

 

 

 

Our Schools

Synergy Multi-Academy Trust comprises fifteen Norfolk schools serving children between the ages of 2 and 18. Our schools work collaboratively together to raise standards and provide education of the highest possible standard, offering the best of opportunities for pupils. The Trust was initially established in 2015. We believe that all of our schools have strengths and areas to develop, and that all can improve through sharing expertise and wisdom. The Trust understands that there will be excellent practice in each school, and that every school will be able to contribute to the development of the Trust as a whole.

Our Schools

Synergy Multi-Academy Trust comprises fifteen Norfolk schools serving children between the ages of 2 and 18. Our schools work collaboratively together to raise standards and provide education of the highest possible standard, offering the best of opportunities for pupils. The Trust was initially established in 2015. We believe that all of our schools have strengths and areas to develop, and that all can improve through sharing expertise and wisdom. The Trust understands that there will be excellent practice in each school, and that every school will be able to contribute to the development of the Trust as a whole.